Xavier Terradas

Hermine Xhauflair

CONTRACT SCIENTIST
(Marie Sklodowska Curie – IF)

I am a prehistorian and ethnoarchaeologist and my research focuses mainly on the way human groups adapted to tropical environments of Southeast Asia and Papua New Guinea at the end of the Pleistocene and the beginning of the Holocene, and how they interacted with the plant kingdom: How did humans use the plant resources from the rainforest and other vegetation formations? What were their practices and how did these change through time and space? What was the impact of the forest on human life and culture? What were the links between mineral and plant technology? What can we know about perishable material culture and the importance of plant tools within prehistoric tool kits?

It is by conducting functional analysis (use-wear and residues) of stone tools that I am gathering data about these questions. My work also encompasses an ethnoarchaeological component as I have been investigating the current use of wild plants by Pala’wan indigenous people in the forested mountains and foothills of the island of Palawan,Philippines.

After receiving my PhD from the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle of Paris and conducting a postdoc at the McDonald Institute, University of Cambridge, I am currently a Marie Sklodowska Curie-IF Fellow at the Archaeology of Social Dynamics (ASD) research group of the Milá y Fontanals Institution (IMF, Barcelona) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC).

My current project is called BeBamb, or “Beyond the Bamboo Hypothesis. A microscopic exploration of plant processing practices in prehistoric Palawan, Philippines, and their relationship to lithic technology.” It aims at determining, by exploring the Palawan case study, whether stone tools from Southeast Asia were mainly used to manufacture bamboo instruments, as hypothesised by the “Bamboo Hypothesis”, or whether lithic tools were in fact used to exploit a wider range of plant resources.

Plant Use in Southeast Asia

Selection of international publications for the last five years

  • XHAUFLAIR H., Pawlik A., Jago-on S., Vitales T., Callado J.R., Tandang D., Palconit T., Manipon D., Gaillard C., Theodoropoulou A., Revel N. & Forestier, H. 2020. Plant processing experiments and use-wear analysis of Tabon Cave artefacts question the intentional character of denticulates in prehistoric Southeast Asia. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 32, 102334.
  • XHAUFLAIR H., Revel N., Vitales T.J., Callado JR, Tandang D., Gaillard C, Forestier H., Dizon E. & Pawlik A. 2017. What plants might potentially have been used in the forests of prehistoric Southeast Asia? An insight from the resources used nowadays by local communities in the forested highlands of Palawan Island. Quaternary International 448, pp. 169-189.
  • XHAUFLAIR H., Pawlik A., Forestier H., Saos T., Dizon E. & Gaillard C. 2017. Use-related or contamination? Residue and use-wear mapping on stone tools used for experimental processing of plants from Southeast Asia. Quaternary International 427, pp. 80-93.
  • XHAUFLAIR H., Pawlik A., Gaillard C., Forestier H., Vitales T.J., Callado J.R., Tandang D., Amano N., Manipon D. & Dizon E. 2016. Characterisation of the use-wear resulting from bamboo working and its importance to address the hypothesis of the existence of a bamboo industry in prehistoric Southeast Asia. Quaternary International 416, pp. 95-125.
  • Borel A., XHAUFLAIR H., Amano N. & Purnomo A. (eds.) 2016. Southeast Asia: Human Evolution, Dispersals and Adaptations. Quaternary International 416, 262 p.

Related links

Hermine Xhauflair

I am a prehistorian and ethnoarchaeologist and my research focuses mainly on the way human groups adapted to tropical environments of Southeast Asia and Papua New Guinea at the end of the Pleistocene and the beginning of the Holocene, and how they interacted with the plant kingdom: How did humans use the plant resources from the rainforest and other vegetation formations? What were their practices and how did these change through time and space? What was the impact of the forest on human life and culture? What were the links between mineral and plant technology? What can we know about perishable material culture and the importance of plant tools within prehistoric tool kits?

It is by conducting functional analysis (use-wear and residues) of stone tools that I am gathering data about these questions. My work also encompasses an ethnoarchaeological component as I have been investigating the current use of wild plants by Pala’wan indigenous people in the forested mountains and foothills of the island of Palawan,Philippines.

After receiving my PhD from the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle of Paris and conducting a postdoc at the McDonald Institute, University of Cambridge, I am currently a Marie Sklodowska Curie-IF Fellow at the Archaeology of Social Dynamics (ASD) research group of the Milá y Fontanals Institution (IMF, Barcelona) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC).

My current project is called BeBamb, or “Beyond the Bamboo Hypothesis. A microscopic exploration of plant processing practices in prehistoric Palawan, Philippines, and their relationship to lithic technology.” It aims at determining, by exploring the Palawan case study, whether stone tools from Southeast Asia were mainly used to manufacture bamboo instruments, as hypothesised by the “Bamboo Hypothesis”, or whether lithic tools were in fact used to exploit a wider range of plant resources.

Plant Use in Southeast Asia

Selection of international publications for the last five years

  • XHAUFLAIR H., Pawlik A., Jago-on S., Vitales T., Callado J.R., Tandang D., Palconit T., Manipon D., Gaillard C., Theodoropoulou A., Revel N. & Forestier, H. 2020. Plant processing experiments and use-wear analysis of Tabon Cave artefacts question the intentional character of denticulates in prehistoric Southeast Asia. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 32, 102334.
  • XHAUFLAIR H., Revel N., Vitales T.J., Callado JR, Tandang D., Gaillard C, Forestier H., Dizon E. & Pawlik A. 2017. What plants might potentially have been used in the forests of prehistoric Southeast Asia? An insight from the resources used nowadays by local communities in the forested highlands of Palawan Island. Quaternary International 448, pp. 169-189.
  • XHAUFLAIR H., Pawlik A., Forestier H., Saos T., Dizon E. & Gaillard C. 2017. Use-related or contamination? Residue and use-wear mapping on stone tools used for experimental processing of plants from Southeast Asia. Quaternary International 427, pp. 80-93.
  • XHAUFLAIR H., Pawlik A., Gaillard C., Forestier H., Vitales T.J., Callado J.R., Tandang D., Amano N., Manipon D. & Dizon E. 2016. Characterisation of the use-wear resulting from bamboo working and its importance to address the hypothesis of the existence of a bamboo industry in prehistoric Southeast Asia. Quaternary International 416, pp. 95-125.
  • Borel A., XHAUFLAIR H., Amano N. & Purnomo A. (eds.) 2016. Southeast Asia: Human Evolution, Dispersals and Adaptations. Quaternary International 416, 262 p.

Related links